Ripple, a Cryptocurrency Company, Wants to Rewire Bank Authentication

Ripple, a Cryptocurrency Company, Wants to Rewire Bank Authentication

A digital-currency company thinks it can protect the personal information used to perform identity checks in the financial industry.

Companies built around Bitcoin and other digital currencies mostly focus on storing and transferring money. But at least one company is trying to prove that some of the underlying technology can have a much wider impact on the financial industry.


Ripple, a Cryptocurrency Company, Wants to Rewire Bank Authentication

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

Rapidly scanning the Internet has become vital to efforts to keep it secure.

When a major flaw in the encryption that secures websites was revealed this March, Zakir Durumeric, a research fellow at the University of Michigan, was the first person to know how serious it was. By performing a scan of every device on the Internet, he realized its full potential even before the researchers who had first identified the flaw, known as FREAK.


Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

Microsoft’s Wristband Would Like to Be Your Life Coach

Microsoft’s Wristband Would Like to Be Your Life Coach

Microsoft is working to combine biometric data collected by its new wristband with information from your calendar and contacts to make smarter observations.

Microsoft’s first foray into wearable activity tracking will go beyond collecting and analyzing exercise and sleep patterns to, say, telling you how stressed out you get before an important meeting and offering breathing exercises to calm you down.


Microsoft’s Wristband Would Like to Be Your Life Coach

Google catches bad digital certificates from Egyptian company

Google catches bad digital certificates from Egyptian company

Google said Monday an Egyptian company issued digital certificates that could have been used to intercept data traffic to its services, which did not appear to have been abused.

The incident is the latest example of longstanding problems around the issuance of digital certificates, which are used to encrypt data and verify the legitimacy of websites.

Google detected on March 20 that unauthorized digital certificates had been issued for several of its domains by MCS Holdings, a Cairo-based networking and security company, wrote Adam Langley, a Google security engineer.

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Google catches bad digital certificates from Egyptian company

Samsung will add Microsoft services and let users remove bloatware

Samsung will add Microsoft services and let users remove bloatware

Samsung both giveth and (allows users to) taketh away.

The South Korean device maker is, for the first time, giving its customers access to Microsoft services and apps in its newest smartphones and tablets. At the same time, Samsung is allowing customers to strip away apps and bloatware they don’t want on the company’s newest phones.

Recent posts on the XDA Developers Forum indicate that many pre-installed apps on the upcoming Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge smartphones can be removed legally and easily. These apps include Gmail, Google + and YouTube; Samsung’s own S Voice and S Health software; and Microsoft’s OneNote, OneDrive and Skype, as reported by Forbes.

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Samsung will add Microsoft services and let users remove bloatware