Small Display Bedevils Some Apple Watch Apps

Small Display Bedevils Some Apple Watch Apps

The 3,500 apps available for the Apple Watch show the device’s promise and pitfalls.

Nobody needs an Apple Watch, or any kind of smart watch, really; we haven’t quite figured out what to do with these things yet, beyond activity tracking and replicating the alerts you already get on your smartphone. But that isn’t stopping app makers from trying to figure out more things to do with wrist-worn gadgets. There are more than 3,500 apps available for the Apple Watch, which started selling this month from Apple’s website (though if you order now, you probably won’t get one until June).


Small Display Bedevils Some Apple Watch Apps

RSA president questions government's role in cybersecurity

RSA president questions government’s role in cybersecurity

The president of one of the world’s biggest computer security vendors says he is skeptical that a stronger government role in cyberdefense will abate the growing number of attacks.

In an interview with IDG News Service, Amit Yoran, president of RSA, also rejected calls by U.S. intelligence chiefs for industry to tread carefully in deploying more encryption in case it cuts off their ability to eavesdrop on communications by suspected criminals.

“The government is not the answer here,” he said, when asked about White House proposals for sharing of cybersecurity information. Despite the growing severity of attacks and a feeling that the government should “do something,” the issue is best left to private companies, because they are the ones developing networks and the technology that defends them, he said.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

RSA president questions government’s role in cybersecurity

IBM Shows Off a Quantum Computing Chip

IBM Shows Off a Quantum Computing Chip

A new superconducting chip made by IBM demonstrates a technique crucial to the development of quantum computers.

A superconducting chip developed at IBM demonstrates an important step needed for the creation of computer processors that crunch numbers by exploiting the weirdness of quantum physics. If successfully developed, quantum computers could effectively take shortcuts through many calculations that are difficult for today’s computers.


IBM Shows Off a Quantum Computing Chip

A Warehouse Worker’s Best Friend—or Replacement?

A Warehouse Worker’s Best Friend—or Replacement?

Robots that work alongside warehouse workers could make online shopping even more efficient and eventually replace human employees altogether.

As Melonee Wise walks toward a row of shelves packed with crackers, bars of soap, and other packaged goods in one corner of her workshop, a squat, wheeled robot carrying a plastic crate glides along behind, like a dog following its owner.


A Warehouse Worker’s Best Friend—or Replacement?

To get more secure, first figure out where you want to go

To get more secure, first figure out where you want to go

It’s always a good idea to point the car in the right direction before pressing the gas pedal, right? Why is it, then, that so many people lose sight of that simple concept?

I’m thinking about information security, of course, but here’s another example that’s probably familiar to most of you: People who, upon hearing that you work with computers, ask a directionless question like, “What’s the best operating system?”“What kind of computer should I buy?”“What’s the best backup?”“The best smartphone?”

Of course, the answer to these questions, more often than not, is “It depends,” though that seems to frustrate the questioners. “Just what does it depend on?” they’ll ask. “What do you want to do with it?” I’ll usually respond. All too often the response to that is a blank stare or a very unhelpful “Oh, all sorts of stuff.”Great, you want to step on the gas before pointing the car, I’ll say.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

To get more secure, first figure out where you want to go

Online Fact-Checking Tool Gets a Big Test with Nepal Earthquake

Online Fact-Checking Tool Gets a Big Test with Nepal Earthquake

An organization crowdsources the verification of rumors on social media in the Nepal disaster zone.

Shortly after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit Nepal on Saturday, social media services lit up with unverified reports of people trapped and buildings damaged. But how could humanitarian organizations know where to respond first? How could they know which accounts were actually true?


Online Fact-Checking Tool Gets a Big Test with Nepal Earthquake