Deep LearningDeep Learning Catches On in New Industries, from Fashion to Finance

Deep LearningDeep Learning Catches On in New Industries, from Fashion to Finance

The machine-learning technique known as deep learning, which has shown impressive results in voice and image recognition, is finding new applications.

A machine-learning technique that has already given computers an eerie ability to recognize speech and categorize images is now creeping into industries ranging from computer security to stock trading. If the technique works in those areas, it could create new opportunities but also displace some workers.


Deep LearningDeep Learning Catches On in New Industries, from Fashion to Finance

Google to Cardboard developers: Keep it short and simple, and watch out for nausea

Google to Cardboard developers: Keep it short and simple, and watch out for nausea

Developers creating content for Google’s Cardboard virtual-reality system should look to short online videos for inspiration and avoid drawn-out experiences.

Content for Cardboard should be “snackable virtual reality,” said Jon Wiley, the product’s principal designer, during the I/O developer conference on Friday.

“For Cardboard, you want [an experience] to be more like traditional YouTube content,” he said, adding that Google’s VR platform isn’t really designed for “long duration experiences.”

Google sees Cardboard as a device that friends can pass around to get a feel for what VR is all about, said Manuel Clement , a user experience designer on Google’s virtual reality team. In that context, shorter content would work better.

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Google to Cardboard developers: Keep it short and simple, and watch out for nausea

Google Wants You to Control Your Gadgets with Finger Gestures, Conductive Clothing

Google Wants You to Control Your Gadgets with Finger Gestures, Conductive Clothing

New Google technology addresses the tiny screen problem by letting you control wearables with tiny gestures, or by touching your clothes.

Small gadgets such as smart watches can be frustrating to use because their tiny buttons and touch screens are tricky to operate. Google has two possible solutions for the fat finger problem: control your gadgets by subtly rubbing your finger and thumb together, or by swiping a grid of conductive yarn woven into your clothing.


Google Wants You to Control Your Gadgets with Finger Gestures, Conductive Clothing

Man charged with selling fake discount coupons on Silk Road

Man charged with selling fake discount coupons on Silk Road

A Louisiana man has been accused of creating counterfeit coupons and selling them on the Silk Road underground websites, potentially defrauding businesses of more than US$1 million, the Justice Department said Thursday.

Prosecutors said Beau Wattigney, 30, of New Orleans, created coupons that look like print-at-home coupons from manufacturers, including fake logos. The coupons offered vast discounts on the retail price of some items.

He offered one of the coupons, for a $50 Visa gift card, for 1 cent, prosecutors said.

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Man charged with selling fake discount coupons on Silk Road

Help Wanted: Robot to Fulfill Amazon Orders

Help Wanted: Robot to Fulfill Amazon Orders

Amazon awarded $20,000 to the creators of a robot that can fill orders most like a human, but it’s not going to replace employees yet.

Amazon announced plans this week to hire 6,000 new warehouse workers to meet growing demand. They will join over 50,000 people currently manning dozens of Amazon fulfillment centers across the U.S., picking, packing, and shipping orders. But if the company has its way, some of that work will soon be done by robots.


Help Wanted: Robot to Fulfill Amazon Orders

Wi-Fi access point scans can betray a person's location

Wi-Fi access point scans can betray a person’s location

Many Android applications collect information on Wi-Fi access points, which researchers contend can be used to figure out where a person is more than 90 percent of the time.

The privacy implications of Wi-Fi access point scanning is often overlooked but presents a risk if the information is abused, according to the study, written by the Technical University of Denmark, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Copenhagen.

Wi-Fi information isn’t considered location data, and Android applications such as Candy Crush Saga, Pandora and Angry Birds routinely collect it.

This makes it possible for third party developers to collect high-resolution mobility data under the radar, circumventing the policy and the privacy model of the Android ecosystem,” wrote Sune Lehmann, an associate professor at DTU Informatics at the Technical University of Denmark, in a blog post.

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Wi-Fi access point scans can betray a person’s location