America’s Broadband Improves, Cementing a “Persistent Digital Divide”

America’s Broadband Improves, Cementing a “Persistent Digital Divide”

New figures show that U.S. broadband access is improving, but only for some.

U.S. broadband infrastructure is improving fast, according to new figures from the Federal Communications Commission. But the gains are uneven, with people that live in rural areas left behind.


America’s Broadband Improves, Cementing a “Persistent Digital Divide”

Google’s AI Masters the Game of Go a Decade Earlier Than Expected

Google’s AI Masters the Game of Go a Decade Earlier Than Expected

Google achieves one of the long-standing “grand challenges” of AI by building a computer that can beat expert players at the board game Go.

Google has taken a brilliant and unexpected step toward building an AI with more humanlike intuition, developing a computer capable of beating even expert human players at the fiendishly complicated board game Go.


Google’s AI Masters the Game of Go a Decade Earlier Than Expected

Your Future Self-Driving Car Will Be Way More Hackable

Your Future Self-Driving Car Will Be Way More Hackable

Carmakers are already struggling to make regular cars secure against hacks—self-driving technology will bring new problems, says a leading researcher.

In recent years researchers have demonstrated hair-raising hacks that make it possible to take over the brakes, engine, or other components of a person’s car remotely—forcing the auto industry to take security more seriously.


Your Future Self-Driving Car Will Be Way More Hackable

The Trials of Barack Obama, Gadget Hound

The Trials of Barack Obama, Gadget Hound

Personal tech and presidential security don’t play well together. So the most powerful man in the world almost certainly carries around a bunch of lame gadgets.

President Barack Obama loves his gadgets. He’s the first POTUS to carry a smartphone, he’s into his iPad, and he’s been spotted with a Fitbit on his wrist.


The Trials of Barack Obama, Gadget Hound

Microsoft Bets That Bitcoin-Style Blockchains Will Be Big Business

Microsoft Bets That Bitcoin-Style Blockchains Will Be Big Business

Giant banks are experimenting with software inspired by Bitcoin, and Microsoft wants a piece of the action.

Earlier this week a consortium of 11 giant banks including UBS and Credit Suisse announced that they had completed their first trial run of the idea of using software inspired by the digital currency Bitcoin to move assets around more efficiently. It was also a test of what Microsoft thinks could be a significant new business opportunity. The experiment, coordinated by a company called R3 CEV using Bitcoin-inspired software called Ethereum, took place inside Microsoft’s cloud computing platform, Azure.


Microsoft Bets That Bitcoin-Style Blockchains Will Be Big Business

Don’t Blame Watson for IBM’s Slide

Don’t Blame Watson for IBM’s Slide

IBM might be overhyping the AI engine that beat humans on Jeopardy! But it would take a superhuman effort to overcome the huge challenges facing the company.

If you’ve seen IBM’s advertisements or have read the proclamations that the company is making a big bet on Watson, its famed “cognitive computing” engine, you might be tempted to think the gamble is failing. After all, as IBM informed investors yesterday, even with the push to infuse all kinds of business services with Watson’s insights, net income fell 19 percent in the last quarter of 2015 and will likely drop again this year. But the problem doesn’t really seem to lie with a failure of Watson as a technology. IBM’s business challenge is so grand that it’s hard to imagine some smarter business services could have solved it.


Don’t Blame Watson for IBM’s Slide