IDG Contributor Network: OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

IDG Contributor Network: OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

This is the first in a weekey series I’m calling ‘weekly roundup’ in which I will highlight some of the hottest stories of the week from the world of Linux and open source. This week, I want to call your attention to some excciting Windows 10/openSUSE news and alert you to a backdoor vulnerability in WhatsApp that allows messages to be intercepted.Replace Ubuntu with openSUSE in Bash on Windows 10

If you are a Windows 10 user who also dual boots with openSUSE, I have some good news for you. You don’t have to dual boot or increase system overload with a virtual machine. You can now run most, if not all, openSUSE tools within Windows 10.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
IDG Contributor Network: OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

Guccifer 2.0, alleged Russian cyberspy, returns to deride US

Guccifer 2.0, alleged Russian cyberspy, returns to deride US

As if the whodunnit into the hacking of the Democratic National Committee wasn’t already confusing and murky enough, the supposed Romanian hacker who first released the emails resurfaced on Thursday to say everyone has it wrong.“I’d like to make it clear enough that these accusations are unfounded,” Guccifer 2.0 said in Thursday blog post. “I have totally no relation to the Russian government.”Make of that what you will.According to U.S. intelligence agencies, Guccifer 2.0 is actually a front for Kremlin-backed cyberspies.“It’s obvious that the intelligence agencies are deliberately falsifying evidence,” said a message on the Guccifer 2.0 blog.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Guccifer 2.0, alleged Russian cyberspy, returns to deride US

Trump's push for cyber defense is sorely needed, experts say

Trump’s push for cyber defense is sorely needed, experts say

President-elect Donald Trump plans to consult “the greatest computer minds” for input on bolstering U.S. hacking defenses, as experts say an overhaul to the country’s cybersecurity is badly needed.“We’re going to put those minds together, and we’re going to form a defense,” Trump said in a Wednesday press conference.Trump made the statement as he said Russia, China and other parties continue to launch cyber attacks against the U.S. In recent weeks, he’s also been confronting claims that the Kremlin used hacks and online propaganda in a covert campaign to tilt the election in his favor.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Trump’s push for cyber defense is sorely needed, experts say

US Intel report: Russia allegedly obtained 'compromising' info on Trump

US Intel report: Russia allegedly obtained ‘compromising’ info on Trump

A classified intelligence report on the Kremlin’s suspected efforts to meddle with the U.S. election reportedly includes a bombshell allegation: that Russian operatives have compromising personal and financial information about President-elect Donald Trump.According to CNN, the allegation was presented to Trump last week in a meeting with U.S. intelligence chiefs to discuss claims of Russia’s role in sponsoring hacks that influenced last year’s election.Trump had questioned Russia’s role in the hacking of the Democratic National Committee before the meeting, but afterwards changed his tune and conceded Russia could have played a role.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
US Intel report: Russia allegedly obtained ‘compromising’ info on Trump

Stock-tanking in St. Jude Medical security disclosure might have legs

Stock-tanking in St. Jude Medical security disclosure might have legs

For better or worse, a security firm’s attempt to cash in on software bugs — by shorting a company’s stock and then publicizing the flaws — might have pioneered a new approach to vulnerability disclosure.Last August, security company MedSec revealed it had found flaws in pacemakers and other healthcare products from St. Jude Medical, potentially putting patients at risk.However, the controversy came over how MedSec sought to cash in on those bugs: it did so, by partnering with an investment firm to bet against St. Jude’s stock. Since then, the two parties have been locked in a legal battle over the suspected vulnerabilities. But on Monday, MedSec claimed some vindication.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
Stock-tanking in St. Jude Medical security disclosure might have legs

The FTC's IoT security case against D-Link will test its power

The FTC’s IoT security case against D-Link will test its power

A Federal Trade Commission attempt to rein in a poorly secured IoT device is raising questions over whether the U.S. regulator has the power to crack down on vendors suspected of shoddy practices.On Thursday, the FTC filed a complaint against Taiwanese manufacturer D-Link Systems that charged the company’s internet routers and web cameras can easily be hacked, putting consumers at risk.But the FTC’s complaint doesn’t cite evidence that the products have been breached, only the potential for harm to consumers.That’s among the reasons D-Link is contesting the complaint. “Notably, the complaint does not allege any breach of a D-Link Systems device,” it said in a statement. To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
The FTC’s IoT security case against D-Link will test its power